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Authentic Business Relationships Authentic Leadership Authentic Negotiating Deal-Driven Growth Podcast Guest

How to Hire the Best

Business psychologist, How to Hire the Best author, and Tap The Potential Founder Sabrina Starling is back with us again! This time she joined me for an amazing interview we conducted live on Facebook. Dr. Starling has coached thousands of entrepreneurs to overcome the day-to-day struggles of business growth by getting out of their own way and developing a success mindset that propels them to higher and higher levels of success (and profitability). Last time we talked we focused on transforming small businesses into highly profitable, great places to work. Today, we focused in on her latest book in her How to Hire the Best series.

Small Business Owners with Growth Opportunities

Years ago, Dr. Sabrina realized she was working with small business owners who were passing on growth opportunities because they didn’t have the capacity to take on anything new. They were stuck in that place so many entrepreneurs find familiar: running their business reports, ordering supplies at Staples, and wearing so many hats they were ending every day drained and exhausted.

Even though they were reaching the point where more and more opportunities were naturally coming their way….they had maxed themselves out and could no longer take advantage of their natural momentum and growth. If they did happen to have an employee or two, they were often what Dr. Sabrina calls “warm body” employees. That is, they were technically hired to work there, so they were there. They didn’t really have that A-Player, above-and-beyond, valuable asset energy of someone who could help you reach a new level.

Dr. Sabrina knew what they needed: to hire A-player employees and increase their capacity! However, she also knew that hiring is a huge commitment. From candidate searching and posting your job, to screening and interviewing, to onboarding and then releasing responsibilities to this new team member — the time, expense, and potential for things to go wrong make it feel prohibitive!

That’s why so many small business owners and entrepreneurs make the choice to put off hiring until “later”. The truth of the matter is, however, that you will never magically become less busy. If your business keeps growing (which is usually desirable!), you’ll actually have less time and capacity. You have to choose to either “cap out”….or find a way to expand!

For Growth, You Need A-Players

As a business psychologist, she tried coaching business owners on how to turn their “warm body” employees into something more…and it just didn’t work. The alternative, however, seemed to be hiring top-line employees. A lot of small business owners didn’t feel that was possible. After all, the more skills and experience someone has, the more they expect to be compensated. 

This felt like a true dilemma, and was one Dr. Sabrina herself believed for quite a while!

One morning, however, she woke up with this question: “What if it’s not true?”

That question resulted in the search for small business owners who already had employees they considered A-level. She started interviewing them, and kept asking how they had found them and hired them. Their answers, again and again, were “I don’t know!”. (They also requested she come back and tell them if she ever figured out, because they all wanted to do it again!)

I see that as “unconscious competence”, which Bob Proctor has done lots of work on! Somehow, some small business owners had hit the hiring jackpot. Since they weren’t clear on how they had done it, they weren’t able to truly profit from it.

Eventually, Dr. Sabrina found that networking and word of mouth seemed to be the key for success. (Very similar to the most proven marketing techniques for finding clients.) Because the small businesses employing these tactics weren’t aware WHY they were working, they hadn’t been able to consistently and methodically employ them for ongoing, repeated hiring success.

Traditional Hiring Methods Don’t Work

When you follow traditional hiring methods, you have a 1 in 4 chance of hiring an A-player. (And a 3 in 4 chance of ending up with another “warm body”.)

Traditionally, you decide you need to fill an opening. You make a job ad, and put that out into the world. As applicants respond, you complete interviews, then you pick someone. That’s how we tend to do it….and that’s the method that offers a 75% chance of missing the best fit for the role.

In How to Hire the Best, Dr. Sabrina teaches employees how to leverage her non-traditional method that’s been proven to work consistently.

Part of her approach includes starting with the end in mind, and employing best practices in a strategic way.

The first question I had is, “When does all this start?” I knew it probably wasn’t going to be “Once you realize you need someone.” – and I was right!

A-Players Think Differently

For one thing, Dr. Sabrina notes that traditional job postings tend to attract people who are unemployed. This can mean they’re willing to accept anything — even if they aren’t that excited about your company, mission, or values, they’ll position themselves as if they are because they need the job. 

A-Players, however, move from one opportunity to the next. They are looking for opportunities, and they transition when people in their networks let them know about promising positions. You should be networking for A-Players long before in the position of desperately needing to hire.

The best time to hire is when you are generating consistent business leads. As soon as you hit your rhythm here, you should be tapping into your networks and using them to look for your next A-Player. I appreciate Dr. Sabrina’s technique here, and see that it would fit into the bucket I call “entrepreneurial freedom”. 

It’s important to note that A-Players aren’t necessarily people who are superstars on every level. An A-Player might be a role player with a very specific ability or capacity — but in your business, that ability is what enables them to shine. You can’t be the best at every single thing, and your employees can’t be either. It’s not fair to expect that from them!

Hiring an A-Player is more about bringing on the people who have the gifts, talents, and personality strengths to do what you need them to do. They also need to resonate with your business’ values and culture. When you can get them plugged in, the change is powerful!

So who are these magical people? Well, they are go-getters, problem solvers, and autonomous agents who know how to use resources. A team full of people who think like that can change your business from the inside out!

Build Your Team to Create Your Desired Lifestyle

Regardless of what you do, building a team enables you to create a lifestyle business that will allow you to step away as needed and have your business continue to run without you. (Your A-players are there making it all happen!) 

This could mean you’re setting yourself up for a 4-week vacation, or that you’re working on a future transition plan. Dr. Sabrina notes that no one comes along and says, “I hear you work 70+ hours a week in your business. I’d love to buy it!” No one is looking to buy a job, they want to buy a business.

When you learn how to hire the best, you’re setting your business up for success, both now and in the future. The more A-Players you bring on to your team, the more value you are adding.

Dr. Sabrina notes that if you currently have many players who are more like D-Players, it can be overwhelming to know how to fix it. She encourages business owners in that position to focus on hiring up as they grow. That might mean you have the chance to replace someone, and you find an A- or B-Player for the open position. Once you hit a tipping point (say 3 out of 5 are strong employees), those who are lower performers will either choose to leave, or will rise to the challenge. 

Gradually, your culture will shift!

If you’re looking to hire the best, you NEED to listen in to this interview!

 

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Authentic Deal-Making Authentic Negotiating Deal-Driven Growth Podcast Guest

Market Upheaval & Continued Growth

Steven Mail was the founder of the largest single manager global macro hedge fund in Europe. His investments center around companies that deliver insights to hidden areas of the enterprise. He is an ambassador for business to Scotland and an advisor to the Endeavor organization. Throughout his career, Steven has experienced market upheaval and panic. He says those things have shaped him for the better as both a businessman and investor.

Steven is also the founder and managing partner of Mail Venture Partners. He got his start as a bond trader and hedge fund manager in London. After “retirement” at age 39, he moved to Florida, where he has continued to engage in investment and giving back. You can listen to our interview HERE.

Getting His Start

Steven runs Florida’s largest youth soccer club, but growing up, he was an aspiring boxer. Both of his parents were involved in athletics, and he had an early passion for them as well. Now, he’s thankful that didn’t work out!

At age 12, he started playing poker (he was quickly playing with kids 5+ years older than him!). At age 15 he started his first job, and at age 17 he started his first business. By 21, he was involved in business. Coming of age in the UK during the “big bang” era had a strong influence on Steven’s career path, as many doors in financial industries were open and there was a strong recruitment drive.

Unfortunately, the week that he started his bond trader trainer also happened to be the 1987 “Black Monday” crash. It was an unusual, emotional experience that shaped Steven’s entire career. He finds that he has always been able to survive and even thrive during the most difficult times in the market, which he connects to the humility and detachment he was able to learn from the volatile markets he experienced early in his career.

Steven also notes that the ability to reverse his positions has been a clear strength. He’s never held too tightly to a stance, and has been able to pivot and change as needed on a moment-by-moment basis. (This makes total sense! Detachment is part of the negotiating framework I provide in my book, Authentic Negotiating.)

Regardless of the difficult market, he started trading in 1987 as a bond trader and market maker. He thought it was a bit like boxing; you put out an offer (throw a punch) and they throw one back and it goes on like that. He loved the years he spent in that arena, and eventually shifted into proprietary trading. This coincided with the launch of the Euro and it’s trade being shifted from headquartering out of Paris and into London. Steven was named head trader, and had a fantastic first year as such.

Growth Through Upheaval

At the end of his first year as head trader, France wanted the Euro trade headquarters to return to Paris. After negotiations ensued it became clear operations were going to be moving. Steven felt uncomfortable about the language change, and eventually it was agreed  that if he made the move, everyone would speak to him in English if he would be willing to come, which got him to agree. Ultimately, he was able to make many connections in Paris, and greatly enjoyed his time there. 

After some time in Paris, Steven returned to London and continued to grow his career. He worked through another crisis in which the market dried up, and things got hard. The markets literally closed, and there was general panic.

Shortly after, Steven became aware of a Japanese pension fund that was desperate to sell half a billion of bonds. Despite the market havoc, Steven decided that everything has a price, and that there was an opportunity there. After evaluating the market, he made an offer they accepted — an offer that covered the losses from all the rest of the positions he’d held during the market upheaval.

His ability to continue engaging in the market and think strategically has enabled him to continue to experience success, regardless of whether the markets are up or down.

Investing in Mentorship & Advising

Steven shares he’s never been in the game to make the most money. Instead, he’s always wanted to have an interesting experience. He enjoys meeting people, traveling, and enjoying new things. As a result, it’s no surprise that his career has changed over the years.

He found hedge fund management to be much slower than bond trading, and when he moved into private company investments he found it to be yet another slow down. Now, he does fewer trades, and they take longer.

Whether you find yourself in trading or investing, Steven notes self-confidence is key. If you don’t believe in yourself, who else will? Beyond that, he also looks for humility and character. In the same way you want your friend group to be made up of great people, the people you invest in ought to be the same.

His investor role often comes with a great deal more advising than his time in trading did. Steven leverages his network for connections, advice, and insight — he enjoys mutually beneficial relationships that highlight giving back and growing. Mentorship has also been something he engages with, from his formal role with Endeavor to his work with the youth soccer league in Florida.

Making Investment Decisions

Steven enjoys finding ways to help companies by opening doors and making connections. One way to do this is to help companies piggyback off of each other in order to scale their growth to the next level. 

He pictures investing as a pyramid, and finds early-stage companies to be the most fun to get involved with. He also notes it’s key to look at and choose individuals when investing in early-stage businesses. After all, the business itself is going to pivot as things progress. Rather than getting too attached to the hoped for final outcome, he finds it helpful to choose founders who have the traits needed to really push through the difficulties and change as needed. To that end, Steven looks for problem solvers who have resilience. Evolution, growth, change, and problems are all part of starting a business, and a founder who can’t endure them won’t be able to build a business that can last.

His Most Important Interview Question

Thinking back 30 years or so ago, Steven notes that the best interview question he ever asked applicants was:

What’s the worst thing that ever happened to you, and how did you handle it?

It may be a popular question now (or at least some form of it), but when he first started using it it was quite uncommon. He was specifically looking for people who had lost money and been able to make it back. Ultimately, he was hoping to find the quality of the “bounce back” in new applicants. No matter how good the markets looked at the time of the interview, Steven knew how quickly things could change. He wanted to hire candidates who would have resilience and grit when things got hard, because it was inevitable that they would.

For longevity and sustainability, you must be able to endure the hard periods and be willing to push through. I remembered a seminar I was at years ago when a speaker who had undergone a great financial failure was asked what his mistake had been. His answer? “I mistook a bull market for brilliance!”

Doing well when everything is going well isn’t that hard. Showing up, putting in the work, and refusing to quit when everything is falling apart – that’s what sets successful people apart again and again.

Growth Mindset

At the end of the day, embracing challenges, showing you can grow through hardship, and making smart decisions are key indicators that Steven looks for when he considers investing. He sums this all up as having a growth mindset, and thinks it is a powerful key to success.

To learn more about how he makes his investment decisions, what values have driven him, and how his journey has continued to unfold, listen in to the whole episode!

 

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Authentic Business Relationships Authentic Conversations About Difference Authentic Deal-Making Authentic Leadership Authentic Negotiating Deal-Driven Growth Podcast Guest

HR Insider Knowledge


Ashley Paré
is a Leadership Coach, Negotiation Advocate, TEDx Speaker, and HR Change Maker. She holds a vast reserve of HR Insider Knowledge that she’s gathered over her career. She’s also the CEO & Founder of Own Your Worth, an organization dedicated to breaking glass ceilings. Her signature leadership program, The Activator®, takes clients on a journey within to uncover the hidden blocks that are holding them back from stepping into their power. This is so they can take action to negotiate the career, business, and life of their dreams!

You may have seen her on Good Morning America, TEDx, New York Times, CNN, and more!

Early HR Ambitions?

When she was younger, Ashley wanted to be an author, psychologist, and live in London. (Looking back, she feels like her HR work was a little like being a psychologist!)

The first deal that stands out to her was her first post-college job. At the time, she didn’t know the “rules” of applying for jobs. She did know she needed to be able to make enough to afford housing and student loans, and when she got offered $15 an hour she countered with $16. (They met her in the middle with $15.50!)

That early success enhanced her confidence and showed her that it was possible to ask for more! However, that was a lesson she’d have to continue to learn how to activate as her career continued to grow. Ashley has seen that many women have a similar need to learn how to speak up and negotiate for what they desire. 

[Note: Ashley specifically works with women, and we focus on women’s issues in this interview. I do want to be clear that we both recognize that “women” are not one monolithic group, and that each person is unique and faces unique challenges. In addition, not all humans identify on a binary spectrum. No matter who you are, I think you can find some gems in this episode!}

Avoiding Your Own Core Truth

Many times young girls have no problem asking for a bigger slice of cake, so to speak. As they get older, however, they often stop.

Some of that may be connected to socialization, which often encourages women to be people pleasers, or to play the “good girl” role. Ashley believes that it goes even deeper, however. Somewhere on the journey, many women begin to lose their sense of self. We abandon our truths to ensure that we are liked and to avoid potential negative consequences.

Because speaking up for ourselves can lead to negative responses….we have a tendency to stop. Our sense of worthiness and self becomes dependent upon external validation, which is never fulfilling in the long run. If we don’t build our own sense of self through self-awareness, of course our inner confidence takes a hit!

This can lead women to retreat into their “shell”. It doesn’t have to, however! By digging deeper, women can tap into their core truth and own their value and their voice. 

In my own work, I see how being disconnected from your own core truth and value significantly impacts your ability to be a deal maker.

HR Insider Knowledge

As a former HR leader and business partner, Ashley had access to salary data, leaders, policies, and the best training. Yet, she still struggled to grow her career. She realized she had stopped self-advocating out of fear of what others would think of her, and focused so much on proving herself until she finally burned out. 

She realized that having the tools to navigate a corporate career is important, but what matters most is having the confidence to speak up and use them. Now she’s dedicated her career to sharing her HR insider knowledge to help clients define and articulate their value and effectively ask for what they want. 

Ashley notes that, in her experience, a vast number of companies prefer to be seen and experienced and flexible and open, especially to incoming candidates! When they offer you a position and potential salary, it’s often expected that you may counter with areas that matter to you. In fact, it might even be encouraged! Negotiating should never be seen as problematic.

The worst thing that can happen is they’ll turn you down; that’s okay! Even if you don’t get everything you asked for, it’s likely you’ll learn more about what your options are and where there may be flexibility within the company. That’s a good thing! 

Confidence in Negotiating

Ashley notes that she offers a variety of packages and rates for clientele. As an early business owner, she was apt to negotiate with clients over those rates. Now, however, she rarely does. She is well established, she owns the proven value she has consistently created over the years, and she sets her rates annually.

When she first started as a speaker, her contracts with larger companies and organizations were more likely to involve negotiating. Now, however, she’s found that she has not only raised her rates, but she’s also started getting more “yes’s”. Her ownership of who she is and what she does, and her confidence in communication, has decreased the amount of negotiating involved in getting the rates she desired.

We both see this phenomenon happening for many of the people we work with and around in our careers. Those who own their value and communicate it with confidence are able to command better rates, broker better deals, and have more success at the deal-making table.

Listen in here for the full interview!

Corey Kupfer is an expert strategist, negotiator and dealmaker. He has more than 35 years of professional deal-making and negotiating experience. Corey is a successful entrepreneur, attorney, consultant, author and professional speaker who is passionate about deal-driven growth. He is also the creator and host of the DealQuest Podcast.

If you want to find out how deal-ready you are, take the Deal-Ready Assessment today!

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Podcast Guest

Negotiating Deals For Business Growth

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Authentic Deal-Making Authentic Leadership Authentic Negotiating Deal-Driven Growth Podcast Guest

DealQuest BEST OF: Financing

This week’s guests feature some of DealQuest’s Best OF Financing experts! They share about everything from finding little known funding sources to minimizing taxes, gaining freedom, and funding your next start-up. Listen in here to get a sample from each of them. In addition, you. can click their name to listen to their full featured episode!

BEST OF Financing: [black background with yellow, orange, and green dollar signs scattered about and reflecting on black surface]

Finding Little Known Funding Sources with Kedma Ough

Kedma Ough of Target Funding is a “small business superhero,” who has worked with over ten thousand entrepreneurs and small business leaders in the last two decades, helping them to attain capital and resources to grow their businesses. Kedma is also the author of Target Funding: A Proven System to Get the Money and Resources You Need to Start or Grow Your Business. She is a fifth-generation entrepreneur and small business funding expert who believes in breaking down barriers and leveling the playing field for small businesses and fellow entrepreneurs.

If you bring to mind the image of a pizza, most people see a single funding source as being the whole pie. However, Kedma notes that you need to look at funding sources as being single pieces, all of which make up the whole thing. You can access so many sources, opportunities, avenues and approaches to filling out your “whole pie” — you don’t need to make one source your make or break solution. Many different funding sources create the foundation for successful funding. 

Kedma’s best advice: Target what funding you need, and use variables unique to yourself to make it happen.

LISTEN HERE for all her tips!

Raising Capital and Avoiding Taxes with Joel Block

A money business insider, Joel Block is a long-time venture capitalist and hedge fund manager (gobbledygook for professional investors) who lives in a Shark Tank world like on TV. Since selling his publishing company to a Fortune 500, Joel keynotes conferences worldwide, delivering business strategies and the inside track for money and success to business executives and their teams.

Now, Joel lives in the world of funding and money! He’s amazing at raising capital, and has great insight on how to make it happen. He advises business owners to consider looking for strategic money. Big companies are looking for alignment with startups and new businesses. Often, they are actively seeking innovation, they want access to fresh new ideas, and they’re often much easier to work with than VC firms. You may get better terms, amazing partnerships, and lifelong advantages if you develop these relationships throughout your business’ life.

Raising capital is an art form. It’s an evolving practice that you continually adapt, and you have to look at it that way. Striking a balance between being investor friendly and promoter friendly is a huge key. If terms are onerous to either side of the deal-making table, things aren’t going to work out well!

Joel’s best advice: Big companies operate, small companies innovate. That’s why partnerships between the two can be so powerful! 

LISTEN HERE for all his tips, including taking advantage of tax breaks!

Entrepreneurial Freedom and Community Building with Niles Heron

Niles Heron has been a part of a number of startups — a few exits, a few exciting failures — and has invested heavily in trying to make paths like the one he took more accessible to the under-represented spaces he came from. He also taught and mentored at incubators and accelerators (TechStars, Gener8tor, Detroit’s TechTown), spoken across the country at events about the value of entrepreneurship and startups to founders and the communities they live in, and is a respected voice in the Detroit Startup ecosystem. In addition, he was honored by Crain’s Detroit Business as a 20 in their 20s award winner in 2015.

Niles notes that helping people make their product actually work is essential. He’s found that entrepreneurs are often raising money to solve the wrong problems within their business. After all, it’s easier to say that marketing, organization, or something else is the problem. However, too often there is a reluctance to reexamine your product and the way it is tailored to your client or customer. He notes that even a Tom Ford suit will look bad if it’s not tailored to fit the wearer. Your product is no different.

You have to be able to get honest with yourself about exactly what it is you need. Capital can certainly help you grow your business, but only when it serves the actual needs within your business. Raising money for the sake of “having” it, or to solve any problem other than the real problem, are never going to lead to entrepreneurial freedom and ultimate success.

Some of Niles best advice: Money isn’t the total solution, and it’s not the only problem. It’s never “just” money.

LISTEN HERE for more of his advice!

Launching & Funding Start Ups with Peter Dolch

Peter Dolch is the President and Co-Founder of Thaumaturgix, Inc. (Tgix) which was twice ranked in the Inc. 500 Fastest Growing Private Companies list. Peter also acts as the Managing Partner at Tgix; the CTO of Biospectal SA (a Swiss-based MedTech Startup); the Managing Partner at AEON Foundry, a NYC-based fund investing in and mentoring early-stage startups; is on the Advisory Board of American Diamond Mint, a new way to buy, sell and trade diamond assets; and is a Science Advisory Board member of DietPower.

There is an advantage of being part of a bigger investor group. Larger groups have the ability to pull money and act as a deal lead, which is powerful. An individual or small fund often has to take whatever terms the lead investor negotiated, rather than set your own terms. However, being part of something larger allows you to be at the table, creating the most desirable possible terms. This lets you be part of even better deals!

Over the last 20 years, the industry has dramatically shifted, for both better and worse. Preferred equity, cap notes, and SAFE options are all options now, but they aren’t created equal. Peter counsels entrepreneurs that what investors tend to really want is preferred equity. If you can create that, you’re much more likely to bring in partners who are invested in your success in a deeper way.

Peter’s best advice: When it comes to bringing on investors and gaining funding, alignment is essential.

LISTEN HERE for more of his advice!

Corey Kupfer is an expert strategist, negotiator and dealmaker. He has more than 35 years of professional deal-making and negotiating experience. Corey is a successful entrepreneur, attorney, consultant, author and professional speaker who is passionate about deal-driven growth. He is also the creator and host of the DealQuest Podcast..

If you want to find out how deal-ready you are, take the Deal-Ready Assessment today!

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Authentic Deal-Making Authentic Negotiating Deal-Driven Growth Podcast Guest

Curating Quality Investment Opportunities

Marcia Nelson is the Managing Director at ShareNett. This is a members only global network of professional investors offering curated, quality investment opportunities. In addition, Marcia is the founding partner of Triple C Advisory. She’s spent a great part of her career working with family offices as a Family Office Advisor. Also, Marcia has been a board member for multiple boards, including VentureCapital.org. She is the president of ACG-NY.  Marcia is also a speaker with a great passion for impact investing. She was recently named one of the 2020 Most Influential Women in Mid-Market M&A by Mergers & Acquisitions magazine.

You can listen to the full interview HERE.

Marcia Nelson’s Early Deal-Making Experiences

While growing up in Salt Lake City, Utah, Marcia would have never guessed she was going to end up in the deal-making world! Her initial degree was in education, and she did teach for a few years. When she moved to New York with her fiance she fell in love with the city. She hasn’t looked back since!

After an initial experience with Conde Naste and the fashion industry publishing, Marcia switched gears when the dot com boom appeared. At that point she went back to graduate school, where she earned her MBA. Returning to the business world after completing her degree kicked off her deal-making career. She’s stayed in the industry ever since!

Most of Marcia’s early deals were in the ESOP ring. She enjoyed learning more about how employee stocks worked, as well as how complicated they could be. This opened a whole new world to her, and she was able to work on many related deals during this time. Early on, she was intensely fascinated by UPS’s use of ESOPs in their business.

Boutique Investment Banking

ShareNett is a boutique investment bank. They do traditional investing, but their niche is finding deals from family offices. Once found, they then partner or club with other families. ShareNett sifts through a lot of “noise” so they can filter the best quality investment opportunities for their clients.

Marcia shares their deals typically start around 10 million. She finds ShareNett can be extremely helpful in the 10-100 million dollar range. She really enjoys working in the family office space, and most often finds herself working in the mid-market arena.

One commonality Marcia is seeing with family offices is having a second or third generation who are actively pushing hard for impact investing. This falls in many spheres, including green energy, sustainability, and other ethically-based fields. She also sees many family offices who have made their mark within a specific field or area; she finds they often prefer to continue working within those same spaces with investments moving forward. If branching out, it often occurs in conjunction with another family office that is more familiar with the space.

Outside of all the political wrangling, there seems to be a demographic shift in which younger generations are inheriting wealth and being given more control over where the money is going.

Marcia believes that investments and philanthropy are beginning to be less mismatched. Younger generations are seeking to decrease the mismatch between where the family office is investing and where they are donating. Quality investments that do good are of great interest.

Making money AND doing good, all without having to rely on investment cycles that tend to fluctuate, is a powerful direction that many businesses may be going. Rather than seeking to become a non-profit, it might become more popular to stay for-profit, but use a percentage of proceeds to fuel social movements.

You no longer have to accept lower returns in order to do good! In fact, you can do good and expect comparable returns.

Other Marketplace Trends & Investment Opportunities

Marcia also notes there seems to be an increased interest in bringing manufacturing back to the US. She attributes this to supply chain disruptions as a result of the pandemic. Covid-19 highlighted just how many products we rely on are being manufactured elsewhere and shipped in.

Many businesses are using repurposing to make this work. They’re finding with small shifts, they can manufacture more of what they need here. Although supply chain issues will never fully go away, adaptations can be made to decrease disruptions.

However, there may be a difference between various types of technology. For instance, there’s a huge difference between bringing steel back, versus producing technological components here. Marcia agrees, noting that manufacturing trends are more manufacturing focused. As a result, many quality investments will likely be made in the US manufacturing markets.

Game makers and recreational manufacturers are also seeing a boom right now, as a result of the pandemic. That might be a short term change, but could also be part of driving deals at the moment. Because people are looking for more ways to spend time outside or engage in private recreation, it won’t be surprising to see continued growth in this area. At least for the time being, recreation is growing!

I noted that Rha and I are in the process of looking around for non-metro-based housing for the future. Based on how things have been going, it seems like it might be a quality investment! We typically split our time between major metros in New York and California, and we’re starting to think somewhere in the mountains might be a better bet. Although that’s not something everyone can do, it may start to become more common in the future. This is especially true for those who are looking at purchasing new properties.

Multi-Generational Investing Families

Older generations may have a desire to make quality investments in businesses that have a solid track history and have been around for awhile. Most technology companies, however, have less of a long term history. Younger generations may often be more excited about making investments with new tech, especially as they often feel more comfortable with the tools. 

However, Marcia notes that if you’ve seen one family office….you’ve seen one family office. They tend to be very unique, and are always composed of individuals with their own interests, desires, and comfort with risk.

One of Marcia’s clients made a lot of money in the gas and oil industry. Although they are glad to have made their money, they are excited to pivot forward by turning their attention to green energy. Tthey recognize that gas and oil were brand new, generations ago, and that they did have many positive impacts in terms of growth and expansion. However, attitudes evolve and shift. Families do to, which is a key point to remember if working with a family office!

As families evolve in their thinking, Marcia also notes that it is vital to remain open to their growth and development. Giving them space to change, and working through what that means for their portfolios, is essential.

Marcia’s interview was incredible. To learn more about her role, including a note on ways in which her job sometimes makes her feel like a therapist, listen in today!

Corey Kupfer is an expert strategist, negotiator and dealmaker. He has more than 35 years of professional deal-making and negotiating experience. Corey is a successful entrepreneur, attorney, consultant, author and professional speaker who is passionate about deal-driven growth. He is also the creator and host of the DealQuest Podcast..

If you want to find out how deal-ready you are, take the Deal-Ready Assessment today!

 

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Authentic Deal-Making Authentic Leadership Authentic Negotiating Deal-Driven Growth Podcast Guest

Deals For Small Businesses

In this week’s solo-cast, I wanted to spend some time talking about deals for small businesses. If you’ve been a listener for a while, you know that one of our premises is that businesses of any size can do deals, whether you have capital or not. It’s a myth that deals can only be done by big companies with big money. While I do have guests who share about large deals involving large amounts of capital, it doesn’t mean that those are the only deals out there. I’ve also featured many guests who own or work with small businesses, and they are leveraging the power of deals (and experiencing great success!) as well. 

Ep. 3: Ramon Ray, with influencer and sponsorship deals.

Ramon is an influencer who has key connections with businesses and entrepreneurs. He doesn’t have millions of followers, but he has quality followers. He capitalizes on that quality following by creating deals between them and other companies.

Ep. 7: John Bly, with acquisition deals, including deals done without significant capital.

John has been able to attract deals by bringing things other than capital (like partnerships) to the table. Within his first 18 months of business he was leveraging his deal-making power to create growth for his business. Gradually he built up to bigger and bigger deals, eventually moving into a succession deal.

Ep. 34: Julia Pimsleur, with an early deal with PBS that she created out of nothing.

When Julia was first getting started with her children’s language learning company, she was looking for gaps in the market. At a trade show event she happened to realize that PBS had a lot of learning related programming, but nothing in her niche. With some planning, she crafted a pitch and signed a deal with them – no major capital needed!

Ep. 41: Ralph Peterson and I ended up having a brainstorming session on small business growth.

Ralph provides management training and other services. On our episode, we ended up having a full blown brainstorm session on the kind of deals he could potentially create. If you want to get your own small business deal creativity flowing, check this one out!

Ep. 42: Gary Kane, with deals in the lower-middle market.

As a founder, Gary knows all about starting with nothing and building up. He’s also an amazing deal creator. In our interview, we especially talked about the kinds of deals that can be done in the lower-middle market.

Ep. 43: Bill Cates, with leveraging intellectual property and licensing deals.

Bill is a speaker, but rather than depend solely on speaking fees, he’s proactively found other ways to make deals and create revenue. One lucrative (and often underutilized option) includes leveraging his intellectual property to create a successful business. From books to videos to workshops, entrepreneurs can look beyond a fee-for-services model and create deals around licensing!

Ep. 75: Jesse Cole, on using creativity to stand out and grow.

Jesse has built many amazing deals based on partnerships. He’s experienced an incredible amount of success in an industry that is often struggling to get by. More recently he’s been working on online subscriptions and followings as a result of pivoting due to Covid.

Increasing Small Business Sales Through Partnerships

If you’re a small business owner who isn’t necessarily looking to acquire other companies or make deals that require large amounts of capital, you’re not excluded from deal-making! Here are a few things to ask yourself as you consider how you might be making more small business deals:

  • How can you increase sales/growth organically through deal-driven growth?
  • How can you make applications to other companies, industries, or verticals by connecting with those who have access to your market?
  • What opportunities might you have to create deals with those you perceive as your competitors?
  • Who is selling complementary products or services to a client base (or demographic) you’d like to break into?

When you consider the client acquisition cost in building a new customer base, it’s worth it to consider creative strategies beyond marketing. Even though partnering with another organization as an affiliate means giving up a percentage of sales, if they are connecting you with a broader customer base and increasing business, it might be worth it. There is always a cost to customer acquisition; why not pay part of that out through commissions rather than via an ads budget?

Depending how you structure your partnership or affiliate deals, you may be able to upsell and cross sell other products without having to share that revenue. 

Just a reminder: these deals aren’t substitutes for other growth methods. They are, however, additional opportunities for small businesses to pursue.

(I also referenced Damon Gersh’s episode on becoming a dominant force in your industry!)

Licensing & Small Businesses

Licensing is highly lucrative, but often underutilized. If you’ve uniquely created something, however, there are a lot of opportunities here! If you offer speaking, training, or online courses, you can consider additional opportunities to license the content to clients.

Rather than paying per use, or you being paid for each individual delivery, you can use licensing to scale your small business.

You can also consider the “train-the-trainer” model, where you retain control of the content but certify trainers who can use your intellectual property. Often, they pay a licensing fee to continue using your content and resources.

Many small businesses underestimate the amount of intellectual property they have available for potential licensing; take inventory of what you have available, and see if you could leverage it for deal-making!

(I also referenced David Bach’s episode, where we discussed licensing as well!)

Building Collaborative Relationships

Consider using this downtime to get into alignment with other local businesses. 

You could create an association and use it as a platform for networking. You can also build either informal or formal strategies for creating collaborative relationships. Many deals can spring out of these kinds of groups!

I remember an area of New York in which related businesses in the home building/renovation space chose to work together to create a district for customers in need of their services. Even though some of these businesses were in competition with one another, by working together to become the “go to” place for their ideal clients, they increased traffic and business for every member.

Entrepreneurs and small business owners too often think they have to be a lone wolf to succeed. In reality, there are many lucrative opportunities to connect, collaborate, and build growth together. We need to get past our automatic assumptions that we can’t work with our competitors, because sometimes it really makes sense!

What Does it Take to Become a Deal Maker

For small businesses, becoming a deal-maker is about getting past the assumption that you’re too small for that to be a valid option. When your mindset is telling you that being a deal-maker isn’t on the table, you become blind to the options you have available!

Shifting your mentality and opening yourself to opportunities can really get your juices flowing and make you aware of what’s truly available.

Right now the economy has created a strong dichotomy; some businesses are flourishing, and others are really struggling. Take a look around; how might you tap into the markets and businesses seeing a lot of success right now? Or how might you bring extra talent into your organization right now as a result of some of the struggles we are facing today?

Covid has also been an invitation to get creative about deals. Contractual rights, ownership or partnership opportunities, and future profit shares are all on the table.

If you’re a smaller business looking to benefit from deal-making, you should take these three steps:

  1. Change your mindset and understand that you CAN be a deal-maker.
  2. Look at your business goals, and consider who you can partner with to achieve those objectives (don’t eliminate competitors).
  3. Focus on shared objectives, and go to a professional to help you sort out the actual structure and logistics of the actual deal.

To hear the full solo-cast, listen in here!

Corey Kupfer is an expert strategist, negotiator and dealmaker. He has more than 35 years of professional deal-making and negotiating experience. Corey is a successful entrepreneur, attorney, consultant, author and professional speaker who is passionate about deal-driven growth. He is also the creator and host of the DealQuest Podcast.

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If you want to find out how deal-ready you are, take the Deal-Ready Assessment today!

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